Day #3

Rules 4,5,6,7,8,9.

Principle 4

And keep My covenant

We do not include “encompassing” directives in the count. E.g. “And keep My covenant” (Exodus 12:5), or “Concerning all that I have said to you, you shall beware…” (ibid. 22:30), or “And you shall be a holy people to Me” (ibid. 23:23).

We are not counting Psukim that don’t instruct us regarding a specific action, but regarding the imperative to observe all of the Torah’s commandments, are not included in the 613

Principle 5  

The reason for a mitzvah is not counted on its own.

At times, the Torah tells us the reason for a command in language that could be understood as an independent precept—when in fact it is simply the rationale behind the words that precede it.

For example, “He shall not leave the Sanctuary, and he shall not desecrate the holy things of his G‑d” (Leviticus 21:12). Not desecrating the holy is not a commandment on its own, rather it is the reason why the Kohen may not leave the sanctuary. Or, “Her first husband, who had sent her away, may not take her again to be his wife…and you shall not bring sin to the land” (Deuteronomy 24:4). Here, too, “bringing sin to the land” is not an independent prohibition, but the reason why one may not remarry his divorced wife if she has remarried in the interim

Principle 6 

A mitzvah that has both negative and positive components is counted as two—one Positive Commandment and one Negative Commandment.

E.g. we are commanded to rest on Shabbat and desist from work on the Shabbat. We are commanded to “afflict” ourselves on Yom Kippur and we are commanded not to eat on this holy day. Though a transgression of one is also a transgression of the other – if you eat on Yom Kippur you have not afflicted yourself; if you work on Shabbat you have not rested – nevertheless these are considered two independent mitzvot.

Principle 7
 

Don’t Count every scenario mentioned as a separate Mitzvah

The different applications of a mitzvah are not individually counted.

E.g. one who inadvertently defiles the Temple or holy foods is required to bring a sin offering (Leviticus 5). If his financial situation allows, he is to bring a sheep or she-goat; otherwise he brings two birds; and if he is completely impoverished, he brings a flour offering. All this, however, is counted as one mitzvah—the mitzvah of bringing a sin offering when this particular offense is committed—although the execution of the mitzvah varies depending on the situation.

Principle 8

לא vs. לא

Do not count a negative statement amongst the prohibitions.

The Hebrew word “lo” can mean both “do not” and “shall not”; and only the “do not”s are counted as prohibitions. The only way to discern between the two is by studying the context of the word.

Examples: “She shall not go free as the slaves go free” (Exodus 21:7). This verse should not be construes as a prohibition, it is simply telling us that the circumstances that mandate the emancipation of a Canaanite slave do not apply to a Hebrew maidservant. Certainly, however, if the owner wishes to free her, he may do so.

Or, “So he shall not to be like Korach and his company” (Numbers 17:5). This is not a prohibition, rather a warning that anyone who dares contest the priesthood of Aaron’s descendents will meet the same fate as Korach and his cohorts.

Principle 9

Do not count the number of times a commandment is mentioned in the Torah, only the act which is prohibited or commanded.

Certain commandments are repeated in the Torah numerous times. For example, the commandment to rest on Shabbat is mentioned twelve times and the prohibition against consuming blood is repeated no less than seven times. Nevertheless, when counting the 613 mitzvot, we only count a prohibited or prescribed act once.

(The exception to this rule is those instances where the Sages have deduced that the repetition of a particular commandment is intended to prohibit or instruct us regarding a different act. In such a case, the [seemingly] repetitive verse is counted as a separate mitzvah—for it is in fact instructing us regarding something different than the first verse.)

It should be noted that though we count the prohibited acts, and not the amount of times mentioned, we only count prohibited acts individually specified in the Torah. At times, the Torah will issue a prohibition employing general terminology, for this prohibition includes multiple acts. For example, “You shall not eat over the blood” (Leviticus 19:26). This prohibition teaches us not to eat sacrificial flesh before the blood is sprinkled on the altar, not to eat from any animal before its soul (contained in its blood) has fully departed, that the members of a court may not eat on the day that they implement a capital verdict, and more. Though all these are biblically forbidden, none are counted as part of the 613—as none of them are mentioned specifically in the Torah.

Day #2

The first 3 (of 14) rules for counting the 613 Mitzvot

Principle 1

Do not count Rabbinic Commandments in this list. 

(E.g. lighting Chanukah candles or reciting the Hallel.)

“were given to Moses at Sinai”

Principle 2

Do not include laws which are derived from one of the Thirteen Principles of Torah Exegesis.

Principle 3

Do not count mitzvot which are not binding on all generations.

Not binding on all generations

Lesson #1 23 Kislev 5775 / December 15, 2014

Introduction:

The Rambam’s rules for counting 613 Mitzvos.

Counting

counting home

The Talmud (end of Tractate Makkot) tells us that there are 613 biblical precepts—248 of which are “positive commandments,” i.e., mitzvot that require an action on our part, and 365 “negative commandments,” i.e., prohibitions. The 248 positive commandments correspond to the 248 limbs in the human body, each limb, as it were, demanding the observance of one commandment. The 365 negative commandments correspond to the 365 days of the solar year, each day enjoining us not to transgress a certain prohibition.

While the Talmud gives us these precise numbers, it does not list the 248 positive commandments or the 365 negative ones. Thus, numerous “mitzvah counters” have arisen throughout the generations – many who preceded Maimonides – each one attempting to provide a comprehensive listing of the mitzvot, each one’s list differing slightly from all others’.

Maimonides prefaces his Sefer Hamitzvot with fourteen guiding principles that allow us to determine which Torah precepts are included in the count, and which are not. He then references these principles throughout the work, and thus arrives at precisely 248 positive commandments and 365 negative ones.

Maimonides explains in his introduction that the objective of the Sefer Hamitzvot is not to explain or elaborate upon the commandments. In an instance where he does speak about the details of a particular mitzvah, the intention is simply to identify which mitzvah he is referring to. The only goal of this work is to enumerate the biblical commandments and to provide explanation as to why certain precepts are counted while others are not.

The following are the fourteen principles :

  1. Do not count Rabbinic Commandments in this list.
  2. Do not include laws which are derived from one of the Thirteen Principles of Torah Exegesis.
  3. Do not count mitzvot which are not binding on all generations.
  4. We do not include “encompassing” directives in the count.
  5. The reason for a mitzvah is not counted on its own.
  6. A mitzvah that has both negative and positive components is counted as two.
  7. The different applications of a mitzvah are not individually counted.
  8. Do not count a negative statement amongst the prohibitions.
  9. Do not count the number of times a commandment is mentioned in the Torah, only the act which is prohibited or commanded.
  10. Do not count a preparatory act as an independent mitzvah.
  11. If a mitzvah is comprised of a number of elements, do not count them separately.
  12. When commanded to do a certain action, do not count each part of the action separately.
  13. We do not count the amount of days a mitzvah is performed.
  14. We do not count the punishment administered for each transgression.

Lessons for Monday, 11 Adar, 5772

Principle 4

And keep My covenant

We do not include “encompassing” directives in the count. E.g. “And keep My covenant” (Exodus 12:5), or “Concerning all that I have said to you, you shall beware…” (ibid. 22:30), or “And you shall be a holy people to Me” (ibid. 23:23).

Verses that don’t instruct us regarding a specific action, but regarding the imperative to observe all of the Torah’s commandments, are not included in the 613

Principle 5  

The reason for a mitzvah is not counted on its own.

At times, the Torah tells us the reason for a command in language that could be understood as an independent precept—when in fact it is simply the rationale behind the words that precede it.

For example, “He shall not leave the Sanctuary, and he shall not desecrate the holy things of his G‑d” (Leviticus 21:12). Not desecrating the holy is not a commandment on its own, rather it is the reason why the Kohen may not leave the sanctuary. Or, “Her first husband, who had sent her away, may not take her again to be his wife…and you shall not bring sin to the land” (Deuteronomy 24:4). Here, too, “bringing sin to the land” is not an independent prohibition, but the reason why one may not remarry his divorced wife if she has remarried in the interim

Principle 6 

A mitzvah that has both negative and positive components is counted as two—one Positive Commandment and one Negative Commandment.

E.g. we are commanded to rest on Shabbat and desist from work on the Shabbat. We are commanded to “afflict” ourselves on Yom Kippur and we are commanded not to eat on this holy day. Though a transgression of one is also a transgression of the other – if you eat on Yom Kippur you have not afflicted yourself; if you work on Shabbat you have not rested – nevertheless these are considered two independent mitzvot.

Principle 7
 

 

Don't Count every scenario mentioned as a separate Mitzvah

 

The different applications of a mitzvah are not individually counted.

E.g. one who inadvertently defiles the Temple or holy foods is required to bring a sin offering (Leviticus 5). If his financial situation allows, he is to bring a sheep or she-goat; otherwise he brings two birds; and if he is completely impoverished, he brings a flour offering. All this, however, is counted as one mitzvah—the mitzvah of bringing a sin offering when this particular offense is committed—although the execution of the mitzvah varies depending on the situation.

Principle 8

לא vs. לא

Do not count a negative statement amongst the prohibitions.

The Hebrew word “lo” can mean both “do not” and “shall not”; and only the “do not”s are counted as prohibitions. The only way to discern between the two is by studying the context of the word.

Examples: “She shall not go free as the slaves go free” (Exodus 21:7). This verse should not be construes as a prohibition, it is simply telling us that the circumstances that mandate the emancipation of a Canaanite slave do not apply to a Hebrew maidservant. Certainly, however, if the owner wishes to free her, he may do so.

Or, “So he shall not to be like Korach and his company” (Numbers 17:5). This is not a prohibition, rather a warning that anyone who dares contest the priesthood of Aaron’s descendents will meet the same fate as Korach and his cohorts.

Principle 9

Do not count the number of times a commandment is mentioned in the Torah, only the act which is prohibited or commanded.

Certain commandments are repeated in the Torah numerous times. For example, the commandment to rest on Shabbat is mentioned twelve times and the prohibition against consuming blood is repeated no less than seven times. Nevertheless, when counting the 613 mitzvot, we only count a prohibited or prescribed act once.

(The exception to this rule is those instances where the Sages have deduced that the repetition of a particular commandment is intended to prohibit or instruct us regarding a different act. In such a case, the [seemingly] repetitive verse is counted as a separate mitzvah—for it is in fact instructing us regarding something different than the first verse.)

It should be noted that though we count the prohibited acts, and not the amount of times mentioned, we only count prohibited acts individually specified in the Torah. At times, the Torah will issue a prohibition employing general terminology, for this prohibition includes multiple acts. For example, “You shall not eat over the blood” (Leviticus 19:26). This prohibition teaches us not to eat sacrificial flesh before the blood is sprinkled on the altar, not to eat from any animal before its soul (contained in its blood) has fully departed, that the members of a court may not eat on the day that they implement a capital verdict, and more. Though all these are biblically forbidden, none are counted as part of the 613—as none of them are mentioned specifically in the Torah.

For the full hebrew Text of Today’s Lesson click here

Lessons for Sunday, 10 Adar, 5772

Principle 1

"were given to Moses at Sinai"

Do not count Rabbinic Commandments in this list. E.g. lighting Chanukah candles or reciting the Hallel.

Indeed, this seems obvious, for the Talmud says that 613 mitzvot “were given to Moses at Sinai,” and rabbinic mitzvot were not instituted until later dates. But in truth, we follow rabbinic rulings because of a biblical mandate: “You shall not divert from the word they tell you, either right or left” (Deuteronomy17:11); and as such, before performing a rabbinic mitzvah, we say a blessing in which we thank G‑d for “sanctifying us with His commandments and commanding us to…” Nevertheless, the individual rabbinic precepts are not counted as part of the 613 (and, are considered “rabbinic,” a classification that has certain halachic implications).

Principle 2

Do not include laws which are derived from one of the Thirteen Principles of Torah Exegesis.

Every word and letter in the Torah is exact, and the Sages extrapolated many laws from an extra (or missing) word or letter, or a particular sequence which the Torah chooses to use (click here for more on this topic). Nevertheless, unless the Sages explicitly say that a particular law that they derived is categorized as biblical, it is not counted as part of the 613.

An example of this is the obligation to accord honor to parents-in-law, a precept derived from an extra word (“et“) in a verse. Though the Torah alludes to the concept, it is not considered a biblical command.

Principle 3

Not binding on all generations

Do not count mitzvot which are not binding on all generations.

E.g. the laws regarding the disassembly of the Tabernacle, or the prohibition against waging war on Amon and Moab, which only applied to the Israelites in the desert

השורש הראשון

דע, כי אומרם “תרי”ג מצוות נאמרו לו למשה בסיני” מורה שהמספר הוא מספר המצוות הנוהגות לדורות. כי מצוות שאין נוהגות לדורות, אין קשר להן בסיני, אם נאמרו בסיני או לא. ואמנם כוונו באומרם “בסיני” – לפי שעיקר התורה שניתנה היה בסיני, והוא אומרו ית’ “עלה אלי ההרה והיה שם ואתנה לך”.

ובביאור אמרו: מאי קראה “תורה צוה לנו משה מורשה”? – רוצה לומר מניין “ת-ו-ר-ה” והוא תרי”א. ו”אנכי” ו”לא יהיה” – מפי הגבורה שמעום”. ובהם נשלמו תרי”ג מצוות.

ירצו בזה הסימן, שהדבר שצווה לנו משה ולא שמענוהו כי אם ממנו, הוא מספר “ת-ו-ר-ה”, וקראה “מורשה קהלת יעקב”. ומצווה שאינה נוהגת לדורות אינה לנו מורשה. שאמנם ייקרא ירושה מה שיתמיד לדורות, כמו שאמר “כימי השמים על הארץ”.

ומאומרם גם כן, כי כל אבר ואבר כאילו הוא יצווה האדם בעשיית מצווה, וכל יום ויום כאילו יזהיר אותו מעבירה – ראייה על היות זה המספר לא יחסר לעולם. ואילו היה מכלל המניין מצוות שאין נוהגות לדורות, הנה יחסר זה הכלל בזמן שיכלה בו חיוב המצווה ההיא, ולא היה המאמר הזה שלם כי אם בזמן מוגבל.

וכבר טעה גם כן זולתנו בשורש הזה, ומנה – כשהיה נתון בדוחק – “ולא יבאו לראות כבלע את הקדש” ומנה “ולא יעבור עוד” בלווים, ואלו גם כן אינן נוהגות לדורות, כי אם במדבר. ואף על פי שאמרו רמז לגונב את הקסוה (=כלי מקדש) “ולא יבאו לראות כבלע את הקדש” – הרי די באומרם “רמז”, ושפשטיה דקרא אינו כן. ואינו גם כן מכלל מחויבי מיתה בידי שמים כמו שהתבאר בתוספתא ובסנהדרין.

ואני תמה זה שמנה אלו הלאוין, למה לא מנה אומרו במן “איש אל יותר ממנו עד בקר” ואמרו יתברך “אל תצר את מואב ואל תתגר בם מלחמה”. וכן האזהרה שבאה בבני עמון “אל תצורם ואל תתגר בם”. וכן ימנה גם כן בכלל מצוות עשה אמרו “עשה לך שרף ושים אותו על נס”, ואמרו “קח צנצנת אחת ותן שמה מלא העומר מן”, כמו שמנה תרומת המכס וחנוכת המזבח. וכן ימנה “היו נכונים לשלושת ימים”, וכן “גם הצאן והבקר אל ירעו” ו”אל יהרסו לעלות”, ורבים כמו אלה.

ולא יסתפק בעל שכל, כי אלו כולם מצוות נאמרו לו למשה צווי ואזהרה, אך היו כולם לפי שעה, ואינן נוהגות לדורות, ולכן לא יימנו.

בעבור השורש הזה אין ראוי למנות ברכות וקללות בהר גריזים ועיבל, ולא בנין המזבח שנצטווינו לבנותו בבואנו בארץ כנען, כי אלו כולם מצוות לפי שעה. ולא הציווי שציוונו שנקריב כל בהמה שנרצה לאכול ממנה שלמים, כי זה צווי במדבר לבד, והוא אומרו “והביאום לה'”. אמרו בספרא: “והביאום – זו מצוות עשה”, אבל היא במדבר לבד, כמו שבאר במשנה תורה היתר בשר תאוה לדורות, והוא אומרו “בכל אות נפשך תאכל בשר”.

ואילו היה ראוי למנות כל מה שהוא מזה המין, היה מה שצווה בו משה מיום שהתנבא עד יום מותו, חוץ מהמצוות הנוהגות לדורות, יותר משלוש מאות מצוות כשנמנה כל צווי שבא במצרים, וכל מה שבא במילואים וזולתם. כולם כתובים בתורה: מהם עשה ומהם לא תעשה. ואחר שהוא נמנע למנותם כולם, יתחייב בהכרח שלא תימנה גם אחת מהן. ולא כמו שעשה זולתנו שלקח מהם דברים על צד העזר כאשר יגע למצוא המספר.

וזה מה שכוננו לבארו בשורש הזה.

השורש השני

כבר בארנו בפתיחת חיבורנו בפירוש המשנה, שרוב דיני התורה יצאו בשלוש עשרה מידות שהתורה נדרשת בהם, ושהדין הנלמד במידה מאותן המידות פעמים תיפול בו מחלוקת. ושיש דינים שהן פירושים מקובלים ממשה, ואין מחלוקת בהם, אבל מביאים ראיה עליהן באחת משלוש עשרה מידות. כי מחכמת הכתוב שאפשר שימצא בו רמז מורה על הפירוש ההוא המקובל, או היקש יורה עליו. וכבר בארנו זה העניין שם.

וכשיהיה זה כן, הנה לא כל מה שנמצא לחכמים שהוציאו בהיקש משלוש עשרה מידות נאמר שהוא נאמר למשה בסיני, וגם לא נאמר בכל מה שנמצא בתלמוד שיסמכוהו אל אחת משלוש עשרה מידות, שהוא דרבנן, כי פעמים יהיה פירוש מקובל.

לפיכך הראוי בזה, שכל מה שלא תמצאהו כתוב בתורה, ותמצא בתלמוד שלמדוהו באחת משלוש עשרה מדות – אם בארו הם בעצמם ואמרו שזה גוף תורה, או שזה דאורייתא – הנה ראוי למנותו, אחר שמקבלי המסורת אמרו שהוא דאורייתא. ואם לא יבארו זה ולא דברו בו – הנה הוא דרבנן, שאין שם כתוב יורה עליו.

וזה גם כן שורש כבר נשתבש בו זולתנו, ולכן מנה יראת חכמים בכלל מצוות עשה.

ואשר הביאו לזה, לפי מה שיראה לי, מאמר ר’ עקיבא “את ה’ אלהיך תירא – לרבות תלמידי חכמים”. וחשב שכל מה שיגיע בריבוי הוא מן הכלל הנזכר. ואם היה העניין כמו שחשבו, למה לא מנו כבוד בעל האם ואשת האב מצווה בפני עצמה, מחוברת אל כיבוד אב ואם. וכן כיבוד אחיו הגדול. כי אלו האישים למדנו שאנו חייבים לכבדם בריבוי, אמרו “כבד את אביך לרבות אחיך הגדול”. ועוד אמרו “את אביך” – לרבות בעל אמך. “ואת אמך” – לרבות אשת אביך, כמו שאמרו “את ה’ אלוהיך תירא – לרבות תלמידי חכמים”. אם כן מפני מה מנו אלו ולא מנו אלו?

וכבר הגיעה בהם הסכלות אל דבר יותר קשה מזה, וזה שהם כשמצאו דרש בפסוק, יתחייב מן הדרש ההוא לעשות פעולה מן הפעולות, או להרחיק עניין מן העניינים, והם כולם בלי ספק דרבנן, ימנו אותם בכלל המצוות, ואף על פי שפשט הפסוק לא יורה על דבר מאותם העניינים, ועל אף הכלל שלימדונו עליהם השלום, והוא אומרם ז”ל “אין מקרא יוצא מידי פשוטו”. ואף על פי שתלמוד שואל בכל מקום ואומר “גופיה דקרא במאי קא מדבר”, כשמצאו פסוק יילמדו ממנו דברים רבים על צד הביאור והראייה.

והנסמכים במחשבה זו מנו בכלל מצוות עשה בקור חולים ונחום אבלים וקבורת מתים, בעבור הדרש הנזכר באומרו יתברך “והודעת להם את הדרך ילכו בה”, והוא אומרם: “את הדרך” – זו גמילות חסדים; “ילכו” – זה בקור חולים; “בה” – זו קבורת מתים; “ואת המעשה” – אלו הדינין; “אשר יעשון” – זו לפנים משורת הדין.

וחשבו כי כל פועל ופועל מאלו הפעולות מצווה בפני עצמה, ולא ידעו כי אלו הפעולות כולם, והדומים להם, נכנסות תחת מצווה אחת מכלל המצוות הכתובות בתורה בביאור, והוא אומרו יתברך “ואהבת לרעך כמוך”.

ובזה הדרך בעצמו מנו חישוב תקופות מצווה, בעבור הדרש הנאמר ב”היא חכמתכם ובינתכם” – והוא אומרם “איזו היא חכמה ובינה שהיא לעיני העמים? הוי אומר זה חשוב תקופות ומזלות”.

ואילו מנה מה שהוא יותר מבואר מזה, ויחשוב מה שהוא יותר ראוי למנותו, והוא כל דבר שנלמד במידה משלוש עשרה מדות שהתורה נדרשת בהן, היה עולה מנין המצוות לאלפים רבים.

ואולי תחשוב שאני בורח מלמנותן להיותן בלתי אמיתיות, והיות הדין הנלמד במידה ההיא נכון או לא נכון – אין זאת הסיבה. אבל הסיבה כי כל מה שנלמד הם ענפים מן השורשים שנאמרו לו למשה בסיני בביאור, והם תרי”ג מצוות.

ואפילו היה משה בעצמו לומד את הלימוד, אין ראוי למנותם. והראיה על זה כולו אומרם בגמרא תמורה: אלף ושבע מאות קלין וחמורין וגזירות שוות ודקדוקי סופרים נשתכחו בימי אבלו של משה, ואף על פי כן החזירן עתניאל בן קנז מפלפולו, שנאמר “אשר יכה את קרית ספר ולכדה … וילכדה עתניאל בן קנז”.

וכשהיו כך הנשכחות, כמה היה הכלל שנשכח ממנו זה המספר? כי מן השקר שנאמר שנשכח ממנו כל מה שידע. ובלא ספק שהיו אותם הדינים המוצאים בקל וחומר ובזולתו מהמידות אלפים רבים, ואלו כולם היו נודעים בימי משה רבנו, כי בימי אבלו נשתכחו.

הנה נתבאר לך שאפילו בימי משה נאמר דקדוקי סופרים, כי כל מה שלא שמעו בסיני בביאור הנה הוא מדברי סופרים. הנה כבר התבאר כי תרי”ג מצוות שנאמרו לו למשה בסיני לא ימנה בהן כל מה שילמד בשלוש עשרה מדות. ואפילו בזמנו עליו השלום, כל שכן שלא ימנה בהן מה שהוציאו באחרית הזמן.

אבל אמנם ימנה מה שהיה פירוש מקובל ממנו, והוא שיבארו המעתיקים ויאמרו שזה הדבר אסור לעשותו ואיסורו דאורייתא, או יאמרו שהוא גוף תורה – הנה נמנה אותו, כי הוא נודע בקבלה ולא בהיקש.

ואמנם זיכרון ההיקש בו והביא הראיה עליו באחת משלוש עשרה מדות, להראות חכמת הכתוב כמו שבארנו בפירוש המשנה.

השורש השלישי

דע, כי זה העניין לא היה ראוי לעורר עליו לבארו, כי אחר שהיה לשון התלמוד “תרי”ג מצוות נאמרו לו למשה בסיני”, איך נאמר בדבר שהוא מדרבנן שהוא מכלל המניין?

אבל העירונו עליו מפני שטעו בו רבים, ומנו נר חנוכה ומקרא מגילה בכלל מצוות עשה, וכן מאה ברכות בכל יום, וניחום אבלים וביקור חולים וקבורת מתים והלבשת ערומים וחישוב תקופות ושמונה עשר ימים לגמור בהן את ההלל.

ותמה על מי שישמע לשונם “נאמרו לו למשה בסיני”, וימנה קריאת ההלל ששיבח בו דוד עליו השלום את האל יתברך – שצווה בה משה! וימנה נר חנוכה שקבעוה חכמים בבית שני, וכן מקרא מגילה. אמנם [שנניח] שנאמר למשה בסיני, שיצוונו כי כשיהיה באחרית ממלכתנו ויקרה לנו עם היונים כך וכך, נתחייב להדליק נר חנוכה – הנה איני רואה שאחד ידמה זה, או שיעלה במחשבתו.

ומה שיראה לי שהביאם אל זה, היותנו מברכים על אלה הדברים “אשר קדשנו במצוותיו וצוונו על מקרא מגילה”, ו”להדליק נר חנוכה”, ו”לגמור את ההלל”. ושאלת התלמוד “היכן צוונו?”, ואמרו מ”לא תסור”. ואם מטעם זה מנו אותם, הנה ראוי שימנו כל דבר שהוא מדרבנן. כי כל מה שאמרו חכמים לעשותו, וכל מה שהזהירו ממנו, כבר צווה משה רבנו עליו השלום בסיני שיצוונו לקיימו, והוא אומרו “על פי התורה אשר יורוך, ועל המשפט אשר יאמרו לך תעשה”. והזהירנו יתברך מעבור בדבר מכל מה שתיקנו אותו או גזרו, ואמר “לא תסור מן הדבר אשר יגידו לך ימין ושמאל”. ואם ימנה כל מה שהוא מדרבנן בכלל תרי”ג מצוות, מפני שהוא נכנס תחת אומרו יתברך “לא תסור”, מפני מה מנו בפרט אלו ולא מנו זולתם? וכמו שמנו נר חנוכה ומקרא מגילה, היה להם למנות נטילת ידים ומצוות עירוב, כי הנה אנחנו מברכים “אשר קדשנו במצוותיו וציוונו על נטילת ידים” ו”על מצוות עירוב”, כמו שנברך על מקרא מגילה ונר חנוכה, והכל מדרבנן.

ובביאור אמרו: “מים ראשונים מצווה. – מאי מצווה? אמר אביי: מצווה לשמוע דברי חכמים”. כמו שאמרו במקרא מגילה ונר חנוכה, “היכן ציוונו – מלא תסור”. וכבר התבאר שכל מה שתיקנו הנביאים עליהם השלום שעמדו אחר משה רבנו, הוא גם כן מדרבנן.

ובביאור אמרו: “בשעה שתיקן שלמה ערובין וידים, יצתה בת קול ואמרה ‘חכם בני ושמח לבי'”. ובארו במקומות אחרים, שערובין יקרא “דרבנן”, וידים “מדברי סופרים”.

הנה התבאר לך שכל מה שתקנו אחר משה נקרא דרבנן. ואמנם ביארתי לך זה, כדי שלא תחשוב שמקרא מגילה, בעבור שהוא תיקון נביאים, יקרא דאורייתא, שערובין דרבנן אע”פ שהוא תיקון שלמה בן דוד ובית דינו.

וזהו שנעלם מזולתנו, ומנה הלבשת ערומים, בעבור שמצא בישעיה “כי תראה ערום וכסיתו”, ולא ידע שזה נכנס תחת אומרו יתברך “די מחסורו אשר יחסר לו”. כי עניין זה הציווי הוא בלי ספק שנאכיל הרעב, ונכסה הערום, וניתן מצע למי שאין לו מצע וכסות למי שאין לו כסות, ונשיא הפנוי שאין לו יכולת להינשא, ונרכיב מי שדרכו לרכוב, כמו שהוא מפורסם בלשון התלמוד שזה כולו נכנס תחת אומרו “די מחסורו”. והיה לשון התלמוד אצל אלו מחובר בלעגי שפה ובלשון אחרת, ולולא זה לא מנו מקרא מגילה והדומה לו, עם המצוות שנאמרו למשה בסיני.

ולשון גמרא שבועות: “אין לי אלא מצוות שנצטוו על הר סיני, מצוות שעתידין להתחדש, כגון מקרא מגילה מנין? תלמוד לומר קיימו וקבלו – קיימו מה שקבלו”. והוא שיאמינו בכל מצווה שיתקנו הנביאים והחכמים אחר כן.

והתימה, מפני מה מנו מצוות עשה שהם מדרבנן כמו שזכרנו, ולא מנו גם כן מצוות לא תעשה שהם מדרבנן? וכמו שמנו במצוות עשה נר חנוכה ומקרא מגילה ומאה ברכות והלל, היה להם למנות גם כן בכלל מצוות לא תעשה אחת ועשרים שניות [לעריות] באחת ועשרים מצוות לא תעשה. כי כמו שכל ערווה וערווה לא תעשה דאורייתא, כך כל שניה ושניה לא תעשה מדרבנן, כמו שבארו ואמרו שניות מדברי סופרים. וכבר התבאר בתלמוד שמאמר המשנה “איסור מצווה” – רוצה בו השניות. ואמרו “מאי מצווה – מצווה לשמוע דברי חכמים”. וכן היה ראוי להם למנות בכלל אחות חלוצה, שהיא מדברי סופרים.

כללו של דבר:

אם נמנה כל עשה דרבנן וכל לא תעשה דרבנן, יהיה זה עולה לאלפים רבים. וזה דבר מבואר. והכלל כי כל מה שהוא מדרבנן, לא ימנה בכלל תרי”ג מצוות, כי הכלל הזה הוא כולו כתוב בתורה, אין בו דבר מדרבנן כמו שנבאר.

ואמנם היותם מונים קצת הדברים שהם מדרבנן, ועוזבים קצתם בבחירה מהם, הוא עניין אי אפשר לקבלו בשום פנים, יאמרו מי שיאמרו.

הנה בארנו עניין זה השורש ומופתיו, עד שלא נשאר בו ספק כלל לשום אדם.